Gluten, hoarding and reading: Boston health and medicine events for week of 3/9

Selections from the Boston Science and Engineering calendar Please double check times.

Monday

Noon.  “Demystifying Drug Development.”   Jonathan Hurov.   BWH:  Carrie Hall Conference Room.  Details, Registration.

Noon.  “Reading and the Brain: A Workshop.”   Joanna Christodoulou.   Harvard School of Education:  Longfellow Hall 320, 13 Appian Way.   Details, RSVP.

Tuesday

6p.  “High-Tech Med: The newest wave of medical innovation.”   A panel discussion.   Follow events live on #HMSminimed.   HMS:  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur.  Details, Registration.

6 – 8p.  “Is There Still Room for Gluten?  Separating Science from Supposition.”   Alessio Fasano.   Russell Museum of Medical History, 2 North Grove Street.   Details.

SOLD OUT 6p.  “Decade of Discovery.”   Celebrating 10 years of groundbreaking science on stage.   Central Square Theater, 450 Massachusetts Ave.   Details, Tickets.

Wednesday 

6p.  “High-Tech Med: The newest wave of medical innovation.”   A panel discussion.   Follow events live on #HMSminimed.   HMS:  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur.  Details, Registration.

6 – 8p.  “Is There Still Room for Gluten?  Separating Science from Supposition.”   Alessio Fasano.   Russell Museum of Medical History, 2 North Grove Street.   Details.

7 – 9p.  “The Air We Breathe: An assessment of urban air pollution“.   Jordan Wilkerson.   Harvard:  Pfizer Hall, 12 Oxford St.   Details.

Thursday 

Noon.  “Overflowing and Overwhelming: Treating Hoarding Disorder.”   Gail Stekette.   McLean Hospital:    Details.

Saturday

10:30a.  “Spring into Health.”   Rhoda Kubrick, Arboretum Docent.   Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Bldg.   Details, Abstract, Registration.

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More from ProPublica:

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Get fit, save the earth and cut down on the *#$!&#!$ Cambridge traffic

In Cambridge and across the nation, Friday is monthly Walk/Ride Day. Cambridge and Somerville are both part of a larger effort to encourage people to leave their cars at home in favor of bikes, buses, subways and feet.  

The benefits of this effort are obvious – more exercise, less pollution.

And —  if you’ve ever sat in rush hour traffic on Third Street, Alewife Brook Parkway, Mass Ave, Harvard Street  or in Union Square– fewer headaches. It can take forever to get from one end of Cambridge to another.  

For more info, check out the Green Streets Initiative website.

New Commonhealth and Ozzy’s genes

Not in the same story

Check out the new and improved Commonhealth on WBUR.org While you’re there, check out Radio Boston’s conversation with new BC/BS CEO Andrew Dreyfus, in particular the discussion of global payments.

From Commonhealth: Massachusetts is the leading laboratory for health care reform in the nation. It is also the hub of medical innovation. But as the nation looks on, what is the reality on the ground here? We’d like CommonHealth to be your go-to source for news, conversation and analysis about these historic efforts as they unfold. Your hosts are Carey Goldberg, former Boston bureau chief of The New York Times, and Rachel Zimmerman, former health and medicine reporter for The Wall Street Journal.

With BHN and White Coat Notes at the Globe, Boston is now a three health-news-blogs town. (Not to mention a lot of niche blogs like The Health Blawg The Health Business blog and Nature Network Boston.)  In blogging, as in  journalism, competition is good. We can see who poaches someone else’s story first.

With that in mind, they did beat me on the link to Julie Rover’s NPR piece on primary care, which features a doc from Maine. But do note that none of the other blogs have this important story:

The Weekly World News — a supermarket tabloid now run as a supplement to the Sun— makes reference to Knome, the Cambridge genome sequencing company. As reported elsewhere, the company is sequencing Ozzy Osbourne’s genome.

Ozzy is interested in finding out why he has survived but the study may well produce an incidental benefit to medical science in general. For instance, it may be that some variant in his genes make this liver better than most at breaking down toxic substances. It that’s true, gene therapies based on Ozzy’s cells could provide powerful weapons in the fight against disease.

Here @ NNB, we scan the all the best medical reporting for links to local scientists.

Health of Boston report, 2009

greetings-from-boston

 

The city of Boston just released its 2009 “Health Report.” Lots of interesting factoids, such as:  

 

Boston’s Black and Latino residents experience higher levels of chronic disease, mortality, and poorer health outcomes than White residents…The city has become more racially and ethnically diverse over the past several decades. In 2007, approximately 28% of Boston residents were foreign born, originating from a wide array of countries such as Haiti, China and Colombia. This diverse population brings with it fluency in a variety of languages including Spanish, French, Chinese, and Vietnamese. The percentage of Latino residents in Boston has continued to increase from 1980 (6.4%) to 2007 (16.9%). Understanding the diversity within our city is essential to combating racial/ethnic disparities that persist in medical care for a number of health conditions and services.

The commissioners themselves blog on it at WBUR’s Commonhealth site. Click here for the full report, or below for individuals chapters.  

Also see my blog entry on the topic of health disparities.

From the Health of Boston 2009

Neighborhoods

Demographics

Socioeconomic Status

Community Assets

Access to Health Care

Environmental Health

Health Behaviors

Natality and Infant Mortality

Sexual Health

Infectious Diseases

Injury

Mental Health

Substance Abuse

Violence

Chronic Diseases

Cancer

Mortality