Will 21st Century Cures Act benefit hospitals?

captureFirst: The Globe is getting some attention for its five-part narrative about a family that helped  start a drug company to keep their son on an experimental cancer treatment.

Nicely written narrative with illustrations and audio. We won’t give away the ending. 

Also, here’s what people were saying a year ago about the “21st Century Cure Act.” It’s been amended since then, but much of what they have to say still applies. My take was: What’s in it for hospitals? 

The drug development and approval elements in the proposed legislation are the centerpiece of a gift basket that has something for everyone: engaged patients, drug makers, FitBit fanatics, NIH-funded scientists, those faced with rare diseases, and those fighting antibiotic resistance.

What do hospitals get out of it? Of course, it depends on whom you ask. One side says it will clear out bottlenecks that are delaying access to better drugs and new, effective antibiotics. That’s good news for hospitals struggling to improve patient outcomes and prevent readmissions. The other side says it will lead to unsafe drugs and a flawed approach to dealing with antibiotic resistance. That’s bad news for hospitals struggling to improve patient outcomes and prevent readmissions.

John Powers, MD, is a former head of the FDA’s Antimicrobial Drug Development and Resistance Initiatives. He is now a clinical professor at the George Washington University School of Medicine and one of the bill’s critics. If the bill’s provisions regarding FDA approval become law, hospitals should be worried that they will be held responsible for drugs that are ineffective or worse, he said.

“If you have a new drug and it doesn’t make the patient better, what you actually end up doing is spending more money in the long run because they stay in the hospital longer,” Powers said. “Or you may have to administer additional treatment to deal with the side effects of that medicine — which costs money.”

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