8/6 Science in the News in the summer in a bar in Somerville

From Science by the Pint

Ling cancer cell, NIH

Monday, August 6th, 6:30-8:00pm at The Burren

(247 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144) (directions)

Dr. Elma Zaganjor, Ph.D. and
Dr. Jessica Spinelli, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Research Scientists
Dr. Marcia Haigis’s Lab, Harvard Medical School

Fuel for the Fire: How cancer cells alter their metabolism during tumor development

(247 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144) (directions)
Events start promptly at 6:30 p.m.

Cancer cells require a continuous source of energy and cellular building blocks to support their rapid rate of growth. Metabolic reprogramming helps cancer cells gain a growth advantage by giving them the ability to consume a wide variety of available fuel sources, from dietary fuels such as fats, sugars and proteins to waste products generated by the cancer cells themselves. Drs. Elma Zaganjor and Jessica Spinelli, two scientists working in Dr. Marcia Haigis’s laboratory, are studying how this reprogramming drives tumor growth in the hope of both better understanding the processes underlying cancer development, as well as how we could potentially use this knowledge to develop new cancer treatments. Please join us for what promises to be an engaging evening with two outstanding speakers and lots of interesting discussion!

Also, on Wednesday, 8/8  science in the summer at the Broad. Be sure to register.

Midsummer Nights’ Science at the Broad Institute takes place at 415 Main Street, in Kendall Square in Cambridge. Each lecture runs from 6:30 – 7:30 pm and is immediately followed by a reception with light refreshments.

The Eliana Hechter Lecture: How do genes control our size and shape?
Joel Hirschhorn
People come in many shapes and sizes, and genes play a strong role in determining how short or tall we are, or whether we are lean or obese. Joel will discuss recent dramatic advances in genetics that have led to the discovery of hundreds or thousands of places in our genomes that influence height or obesity, what this tells us about the biology of human height and weight, and how these discoveries could lead to new treatments for obesity.

 

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Tonight 11/20: Heart disease and inflammation explained to you, not in a lecture hall but in an Irish pub

From the Science by the Pint website. Full schedule below

Dr. Peter Libby
of Harvard Medical School

Fanning the Flames: New Links Between Inflammation and Heart Disease

Monday, November 20th, 6:30-8:30 at The Burren (247 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144) (directions)

Half of all heart attacks occur in people with normal cholesterol levels. For decades, scientists and physicians have postulated that inflammation might be another critical, if not necessary, factor for driving heart disease. Dr. Peter Libby’s research group at Brigham and Women’s Hospital is dedicated to examining the link between inflammation and atherosclerosis, a condition which often precedes heart attack, and how we can use this knowledge to prevent heart disease. In the clinic, Dr. Libby and his colleagues, in association with Novartis, recently completed a landmark study (CANTOS) that showed that lowering inflammation independently of cholesterol can reduce the risk of heart attack, offering the first direct evidence that inflammation directly contributes to heart disease.

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Tonight! Meet the #STATnews team at The Burren pub in Somerville #science

Science in the News was started by Harvard students who wanted to help explain complex issues to the public. The group has expanded beyond that to events like:

Tonight! Science by the Pint with The STAT Team

The (sometimes messy) science of communicating sciencesbtp_spring2017_1pg

Monday, January 9, 6:30-8:30pm at The Burren (247 Elm Street, Somerville) (directions)

Are you interested in learning more about what the field of science journalism looks like from the inside? Panelists from the Boston-based publication STAT will discuss what led them to a career in health and science journalism, as well as the challenges and value of investigating and reporting in this field. Small group discussions will follow the panel, so you’ll have a chance to ask questions and bring up topics you want to discuss. Members of the panel will represent a broad range of careers within science journalism, including reporting, editing, social media, marketing, multimedia, and graphic design.

About STAT (from statnews.com): STAT is a new national publication focused on finding and telling compelling stories about health, medicine, and scientific discovery. We produce daily news, investigative articles, and narrative projects in addition to multimedia features. We tell our stories from the places that matter to our readers – research labs, hospitals, executive suites, and political campaigns.