Harvard Business Review on sexual harassment in health care

From HBR,  which has a three story pay-wall:

Many factors make an organization prone to sexual harassment: a hierarchicalstructure, a male-dominated environment, and a climate that tolerates transgressions — particularly when they are committed by those with power. Medicinehas all three of these elements. And academic medicine, compared to other scientific fields, has the highest incidence of gender and sexual harassment. Thirty to seventypercent of female physicians and as many as half of female medical students report being sexually harassed.

As we wrote in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, “Imagine a medical-school dean addressing the incoming class with this demoralizing prediction: ‘Look at the woman to your left and then at the woman to your right. On average, one of them will be sexually harassed during the next 4 years, before she has even begun her career as a physician’.”

The NEJM

nci-vol-1884-150
National Cancer Institute archives

 piece is not:

The declaration of “Time’s Up” for medicine feels at once urgent and aspirational. Putting an end to the culture of gender-based harassment is key to recruiting, retaining, and realizing the full potential of the female-majority health care workforce, including 1 in 3 physicians, and feels long overdue. Actually running down the clock on harassment, however, will depend on our willingness to undergo a complete transformation in how we conceive of, approach, and prioritize this problem.

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