At Harvard, heroes and villians, sugar and supplements

screen-shot-2017-01-16-at-9-04-30-pmGary Taubes’ sugar takedown continued in the NYTimes SundayReview, including reference to the late Fred Stare, founder of the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health. In the 1970s Stare was  reportedly paid to exonerate sugar in journal supplement, “Sugar in the Diet of Man,

STATNews refers to the case of another Harvard doctor, this one who found himself on the wrong side of a supplement maker. 

The jury trial had momentous implications for the future of research into the safety of weight-loss and muscle-building pills; for the freedom of academics to speak out about matters of public health; and for our ability to learn what’s in the supplements on our kitchen counters.

 

Coffee and prostate cancer: Not what you think

That wacky comic hero Too Much Coffee Man will rejoice!

A new Harvard study has found that men who drink 1 to 3 cups of coffee a day had a 20 percent lower risk of serious prostate cancer than non-coffee drinkers. The risk is 25 percent lower for those who 4 or 5 cups.

As Bloomberg reports:

In research involving 50,000 men over 20 years, scientists led by Kathryn Wilson at Harvard’s Channing Laboratory found that the 5 percent of men who drank 6 or more cups a day had a 60 percent lower risk of developing the advanced form of the disease than those who didn’t consume any.

Hear us now — This does NOT mean coffee prevents prostate cancer. All this type of study measures is correlation — not cause and effect. But, that’s a pretty strong correlation.

And, don’t get all hyper about it. Decaf had the same effect.

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