BPA linked to infertility? Until we know more, how to reduce exposure

From Boston.com A growing body of evidence suggests that women who have high urine levels of bisphenol-A—a chemical used in some hard plastics and to coat metal cans—are more likely to suffer from infertility, and now researchers have found a possible reason why. BPA may disrupt eggs from maturing properly, according to a study from … Continue reading BPA linked to infertility? Until we know more, how to reduce exposure

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Hormone disrupters: Is Triclosan the next BPA?

 From the Globe  Some scientists and environmentalists say triclosan may do more harm than good because — while industry insists it is safe in everyday applications — there is evidence it can disrupt animal hormones.  Representative Edward J. Markey, following several months of correspondence with federal agencies about potential health effects, is calling on the … Continue reading Hormone disrupters: Is Triclosan the next BPA?

Mass. warning on BPA baby bottles and the brothers Koh

The state is urging parents to stop using BPA baby bottles. DPH is specifically advising mothers of children up to two years old to avoid the use of products that contain BPA for making or storing infant formula and breast milk. Current research suggests that BPA levels in newborns may be much higher than in adults. … Continue reading Mass. warning on BPA baby bottles and the brothers Koh

Harvard students have drinking problem: bisphenol A

And, when it comes to BPA, the FDA has a little problem with objectivity, according to a report in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal. First to Boston. The Globe reports that a Harvard prof was inspired to do a new study on the suspect by-product of some plastics when she saw her student drinking out of bottles. Led by … Continue reading Harvard students have drinking problem: bisphenol A