Two babies, two rattles, one heart. The complicated decision to separate conjoined twins when only one will survive

Oscar J. Benavidez, MD, the MGH pediatric cardiologist  involved in a difficult separation of conjoined twin girls, remembers a painful moment on the day of surgery. When the joined babies were rolled into the OR, each was holding a rattle. He and the others knew: only one of them would leave the operating room alive. … Continue reading Two babies, two rattles, one heart. The complicated decision to separate conjoined twins when only one will survive

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Selkoe to discuss #amyloid and #Alzheimer’s in wake of another disappointing drug study

A recent story in The Atlantic asks "Is the Leading Theory About Alzheimer's Wrong?" For years, scientist have been arguing about whether amyloid protein in the brain is a cause,or just a symptom of condition.  Pharma has been confident -- or desperate -- enough in the science to bet on amyloid clearing drugs, but they … Continue reading Selkoe to discuss #amyloid and #Alzheimer’s in wake of another disappointing drug study

Tonight! Meet the #STATnews team at The Burren pub in Somerville #science

Science in the News was started by Harvard students who wanted to help explain complex issues to the public. The group has expanded beyond that to events like: Tonight! Science by the Pint with The STAT Team The (sometimes messy) science of communicating science Monday, January 9, 6:30-8:30pm at The Burren (247 Elm Street, Somerville) … Continue reading Tonight! Meet the #STATnews team at The Burren pub in Somerville #science

The New Yorker:#Boston researchers are hunting for a #Zika vaccine — trco201

The August 22 edition of The New Yorker includes a story by Siddhartha Mukhergee on Dan Barouch, director, Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at BIDMC. He’s on the hunt for a Zika vaccine and his work on HIV is informing the effort. From the article, which is not behind the NYer pay wall:  

Will genetic advances address health disparities? Not much unless they are accessible.

The new issue of Health Affairs looks at health policy and health disparities. Many local researchers represented. Of interest: Using Genetic Technologies To Reduce, Rather Than Widen, Health Disparities.  The authors include two local researchers: Katherine L. Tucker is a professor in clinical laboratory and nutritional sciences at the University of Massachusetts, in Lowell...José M. Ordovás is … Continue reading Will genetic advances address health disparities? Not much unless they are accessible.

From ob/gyn to surgery, MGH study found salaries for male doctors higher than #female #doctors at public US #medical #schools

From JAMA Internal Medicine: Question Do differences in salary exist between male and female academic physicians in US public medical schools? Relying on Freedom of Information laws that mandate release of salary information of public university employees in several states, this study analyzed sex differences in academic physician salary among 10 241 physicians in 24 public … Continue reading From ob/gyn to surgery, MGH study found salaries for male doctors higher than #female #doctors at public US #medical #schools

#Massachusetts cares if #doctors have conflicts of interest, but do #patients care?

The Globe offers a peek at the drug company marketing/meals at smaller hospitals Years after many big academic medical centers cracked down on industry perks, drug companies still regularly buy meals for doctors affiliated with smaller hospitals, a new analysis shows, with some physicians receiving dozens of lunches and dinners in a single year. At a number … Continue reading #Massachusetts cares if #doctors have conflicts of interest, but do #patients care?