From Health Leaders: Shame, fear and medical errors

From a recent talk 978-080703330-2at Harvard by Danielle Ofri, MD, author of What Doctors Feel.

Ofri’s talk centered on one emotion, shame, which she said overwhelms many doctors and is a major reason many medical errors go unaddressed.

When errors are not acknowledged, even those without bad outcomes, no one learns from them, she said. And, there is little incentive for doctors to point out their shortfalls. “We want to look like we know what we are doing. When in doubt, pretend. That’s what I learned in my internship. “

Click here for full story from Health Leaders Media 

Will genetic advances address health disparities? Not much unless they are accessible.

The new issue of Health Affairs looks at health policy and health disparities. Many local researchers represented.

Of interest: Using Genetic Technologies To Reduce, Rather Than Widen, Health Disparities

The authors include two local researchers: Katherine L. Tucker is a professor in clinical laboratory and nutritional sciences at the University of MassachuseCapturetts, in Lowell…José M. Ordovás is director of the Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory at the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University

Evidence shows that both biological and nonbiological factors contribute to health disparities. Genetics, in particular, plays a part in how common diseases manifest themselves. Today, unprecedented advances in genetically based diagnoses and treatments provide opportunities for personalized medicine. However, disadvantaged groups may lack access to these advances, and treatments based on research on non-Hispanic whites might not be generalizable to members of minority groups. Unless genetic technologies become universally accessible, existing disparities could be widened. Addressing this issue will require integrated strategies, including expanding genetic research, improving genetic literacy, and enhancing access to genetic technologies among minority populations in a way that avoids harms such as stigmatization.

And, a team from Harvard offers this :

Across US Hospitals, Black Patients Report Comparable Or Better Experiences Than White Patients

Patient-reported experience is a critical part of measuring health care quality. There are limited data on racial differences in patient experience. Using patient-level data for 2009–10 from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), we compared blacks’ and whites’ responses on measures of overall hospital rating, communication, clinical processes, and hospital environment. In unadjusted results, there were no substantive differences between blacks’ and whites’ ratings of hospitals. Blacks were less likely to recommend hospitals but reported more positive experiences, compared to whites. Higher educational attainment and self-reported worse health status were associated with more negative evaluations in both races. Additionally, blacks rated minority-serving hospitals worse than other hospitals on all HCAHPS measures. Taken together, there were surprisingly few meaningful differences in patient experience between blacks and whites across US hospitals. Although blacks tend to receive care at worse-performing hospitals, compared to whites, within any given hospital black patients tend to report better experience than whites do.

 

 

 

Are two big #hospital groups better than one? #consolidation

At Wednesday’s meeting, the  Massachusetts Health Policy Commission heard a staff report on the proposed merger of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Capture
From the report. AMC= academic medical center

 In summary, we find that these transactions are anticipated to increase market concentration, solidify BIDCO’s position as the second largest hospital network in the state, and could strengthen BIDCO’s ability to leverage higher prices and other favorable contract terms. However, BIDCO’s market share will remain far smaller than the dominant system in the state for most services.

Member of the commission pondered the impact of having two large hospital systems, instead of just one giant one — Partners. Their conclusion — no one really knows, but it would be worth finding out.  We’ll see where that goes.

From the Globe:

“… commissioners noted that the growth of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Beth Israel Deaconess Care Organization, or BIDCO, could be a good thing. BIDCO is a network of affiliated doctors and hospitals that negotiates contracts with insurers and gives its members set budgets under which to manage patient care.

“To me, big is not necessarily bad,” said Marylou Sudders, the state secretary of health and human services, who sits on the commission. “Shouldn’t Massachusetts have… a strong competitor to what is the largest and most expensive health system?”

The commission said that by adding MetroWest and the Baptist to its network, BIDCO will solidify its place as the state’s second largest provider network. But it will remain much smaller than Partners, with about 13 percent of all hospital discharges, compared to 29 percent for Partners.