8/6 Science in the News in the summer in a bar in Somerville

From Science by the Pint

Ling cancer cell, NIH

Monday, August 6th, 6:30-8:00pm at The Burren

(247 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144) (directions)

Dr. Elma Zaganjor, Ph.D. and
Dr. Jessica Spinelli, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Research Scientists
Dr. Marcia Haigis’s Lab, Harvard Medical School

Fuel for the Fire: How cancer cells alter their metabolism during tumor development

(247 Elm St, Somerville, MA 02144) (directions)
Events start promptly at 6:30 p.m.

Cancer cells require a continuous source of energy and cellular building blocks to support their rapid rate of growth. Metabolic reprogramming helps cancer cells gain a growth advantage by giving them the ability to consume a wide variety of available fuel sources, from dietary fuels such as fats, sugars and proteins to waste products generated by the cancer cells themselves. Drs. Elma Zaganjor and Jessica Spinelli, two scientists working in Dr. Marcia Haigis’s laboratory, are studying how this reprogramming drives tumor growth in the hope of both better understanding the processes underlying cancer development, as well as how we could potentially use this knowledge to develop new cancer treatments. Please join us for what promises to be an engaging evening with two outstanding speakers and lots of interesting discussion!

Also, on Wednesday, 8/8  science in the summer at the Broad. Be sure to register.

Midsummer Nights’ Science at the Broad Institute takes place at 415 Main Street, in Kendall Square in Cambridge. Each lecture runs from 6:30 – 7:30 pm and is immediately followed by a reception with light refreshments.

The Eliana Hechter Lecture: How do genes control our size and shape?
Joel Hirschhorn
People come in many shapes and sizes, and genes play a strong role in determining how short or tall we are, or whether we are lean or obese. Joel will discuss recent dramatic advances in genetics that have led to the discovery of hundreds or thousands of places in our genomes that influence height or obesity, what this tells us about the biology of human height and weight, and how these discoveries could lead to new treatments for obesity.

 

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