Don’t take your #vitamins, says doctor from the Cambridge Health Alliance

fruit-photoEven though it is affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the Cambridge Health Alliance is often overlooked in this land of huge, lauded teaching hospitals. But Dr. Pieter A. Cohen’s editorial about supplements in JAMA gets a mention in  a story in this Tuesday’s Well column  in The New York Times.

Americans spend more than $30 billion a year on dietary supplementsvitamins, minerals and herbal products, among others — many of which are unnecessary or of doubtful benefit to those taking them. That comes to about $100 a year for every man, woman and child for substances that are often of questionable value…

In an editorial entitled “The Supplement Paradox: Negligible Benefits, Robust Consumption” accompanying the new report, Dr. Pieter A. Cohen, of Cambridge Health Alliance and Somerville Hospital Primary Care in Massachusetts, pointed out that “supplements are essential to treat vitamin and mineral deficiencies” and that certain combinations of nutrients can help some medical conditions, like age-related macular degeneration. He added, however, “for the majority of adults, supplements likely provide little, if any, benefit.”

Among the changes found in the new study: multivitamin/mineral use declined to 31 percent from 37 percent, “and the rates of vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium use decreased, perhaps in response to research findings showing no benefit,” Dr. Cohen wrote. Sometimes people do act sensibly when faced with solid evidence.

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