Will genetic advances address health disparities? Not much unless they are accessible.

The new issue of Health Affairs looks at health policy and health disparities. Many local researchers represented.

Of interest: Using Genetic Technologies To Reduce, Rather Than Widen, Health Disparities

The authors include two local researchers: Katherine L. Tucker is a professor in clinical laboratory and nutritional sciences at the University of MassachuseCapturetts, in Lowell…José M. Ordovás is director of the Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory at the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University

Evidence shows that both biological and nonbiological factors contribute to health disparities. Genetics, in particular, plays a part in how common diseases manifest themselves. Today, unprecedented advances in genetically based diagnoses and treatments provide opportunities for personalized medicine. However, disadvantaged groups may lack access to these advances, and treatments based on research on non-Hispanic whites might not be generalizable to members of minority groups. Unless genetic technologies become universally accessible, existing disparities could be widened. Addressing this issue will require integrated strategies, including expanding genetic research, improving genetic literacy, and enhancing access to genetic technologies among minority populations in a way that avoids harms such as stigmatization.

And, a team from Harvard offers this :

Across US Hospitals, Black Patients Report Comparable Or Better Experiences Than White Patients

Patient-reported experience is a critical part of measuring health care quality. There are limited data on racial differences in patient experience. Using patient-level data for 2009–10 from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), we compared blacks’ and whites’ responses on measures of overall hospital rating, communication, clinical processes, and hospital environment. In unadjusted results, there were no substantive differences between blacks’ and whites’ ratings of hospitals. Blacks were less likely to recommend hospitals but reported more positive experiences, compared to whites. Higher educational attainment and self-reported worse health status were associated with more negative evaluations in both races. Additionally, blacks rated minority-serving hospitals worse than other hospitals on all HCAHPS measures. Taken together, there were surprisingly few meaningful differences in patient experience between blacks and whites across US hospitals. Although blacks tend to receive care at worse-performing hospitals, compared to whites, within any given hospital black patients tend to report better experience than whites do.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: