The persistence of low-value services

CaptureAnalysis from Health Leaders Media:

Turns out, it’s not so easy to make wise choices about healthcare. Several new studies find that, even with urging, doctors and patients are having a hard time passing on low-value services, including many identified in the Choosing Wisely campaign.  

Not that it should be a surprise. You don’t need an MD to know that change is difficult.

The specialty societies of the Choosing Wisely campaign have offered up a menu of low-value services they suggest patients can live (well) without. The trick is to convince providers and patients to abandon superfluous old-reliables and “might-as-well” tests. They waste money and can do more harm than good.

Somehow, the message isn’t getting through…

And this release today on the ACOG meeting mentioned in the story:


Breast Cancer Screening Conference Addressed Mammography Guidelines

Washington, DC – More than 50 stakeholders in women’s health convened on the 28th and 29th of January, 2016, at the headquarters of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) to discuss recommendations on mammography for breast cancer screening. Participants reviewed current data and provided perspective on the interpretation of the data and resultant recommendations for breast cancer screening.

 

The primary issues addressed at this conference included when screening should be initiated, how frequently mammography should be performed, and if there is a point in a women’s life at which mammographic screening may no longer be beneficial. Although clearly important, other aspects of breast cancer screening – including the role of clinical breast exam and screening for high-risk women or those with dense breasts – were determined to be beyond the scope of this conference.

 

Participants in the conference included representatives from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the American Cancer Society, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), the American College of Radiology, the American College of Surgeons, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Physicians, and ACOG. In addition, representatives from more than 22 other organizations representing women’s health care providers, radiologists, patient advocate organizations, and allied women’s health professional communities participated in the conference. Furthermore, patient representatives also provided valuable input.

 

The participants will continue the efforts at addressing breast cancer screening recommendations. It is hoped that the outcome of these conversations will help to improve informed decision-making among women and their health care providers.

 

 

 

 

 

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