Don’t have a hot attack: Framingham Heart Study carries on

fhsWhat is up with the Framingham Heart Study? That long-running research project has been tracking the cardiac health of hundreds of local folk for decades.  (The algorithm used to estimate the 10-year risk of heart disease is called the “The Framingham Risk Score.”)

A story and a blog post recently reported woefully about a 40 percent sequester cut to the study’s National Institutes of Health funding.  Neither quoted anyone from NIH.

So, both pieces failed to note that the cut is to the study’s administrative grant from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, not its research grants.  According to BU, the study receives an estimated $5.4 million in NIH grants for research. This funding is not impacted by the 40 percent cut.

In other words, the cuts come from the money used to run the program – office staff, data collection and the management of study subjects, not the scientific research projects that fall under the program’s umbrella. The data collected from the locals helps researcher understand the mechanics and, more recently, the genetics of heart disease as it impacts the rest of us.

In total, NIH says it will spend $21 million this year contracts for the FHS study infrastructure – including a study looking for biomarkers for heart disease. In addition to funding the BU research, NIH says its grants cover 17 FHS related studies at eight different organizations and universities. In addition to the Heart Lung and Blood institute, that money comes from five other NIH institutes and centers, including the National Institute on Aging, The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

None of this was clear in this first, July 20 story from the Metro West Daily:

The Framingham Heart Study expects to lose $4 million in funding as part of the federal budget cuts known as sequestration, study officials confirmed Friday in a statement. The $4 million cut takes effect Aug. 1 and represents 40 percent of funding it receives from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a division of the National Institutes of Health, the statement said.

 The story quotes a spokeswoman from Boston University, which is home to the study.

The cut with “result in a reduction in workforce affecting 19 staff from a variety of clinical and administrative areas, as well as reductions in clinic exams and lab operations.”

Then it quotes from a statement about NIH cuts in general from new Sen. Ed Markey:

“Slashing critical federal investment in medical research jeopardizes the health of many Massachusetts residents, while putting at risk tens of thousands of jobs in the commonwealth’s innovation economy and the industries they support,” Markey said. 

Then it quotes from Karen LaChance, a Framingham resident and president of the Friends of the Framingham Heart Study.

“We just hate to see any cut. It delays hopefully finding whatever the magic bullet might be to prevent heart disease.

Then it doesn’t quote anyone from NIH.

In a post on the Metro West Daily story,  WBUR’s CommonHealth blog offers the headline “Famed Framingham Heart Study Faces Deep Cuts From Federal Sequester.”

It was a “Say it isn’t so” moment this morning when I saw this MetroWest Daily News headline: Framingham Heart Study Faces $4 Million Cut. “Heart disease is the country’s number 1 killer, and chances are whatever you do to prevent it or treat it was influenced by the Framingham Heart Study, a venerable epidemiological gem right here in our own Boston suburbia….”

But, you could argue that it ain’t so.

As far as the impact of the cuts, Metro West Daily quote  BU as noting that “This loss of funding will result in a reduction in workforce affecting 19 staff from a variety of clinical and administrative areas, as well as reductions in clinic exams and lab operations.”

BU tells us that approximately 80 people work at the FHS. “The affected staff will see a reduction in hours beginning Aug. 19; if alternative funding sources are not identified, a layoff would occur Nov. 1. “

The FHS site was a little clearer on all this, with note on its home page:

New Information for FHS Participants edited July 20 2013

Q. Is the FHS closing?
A. No. The current Offspring and Omni Group 1 exams are continuing to Oct. 31, 2013. Ancillary studies are continuing as planned. Medical history updates are being collected on the regular schedule. Please respond to calls for FHS participation as usual.

By Wednesday August 1, BU had posted its own story on the BU Today website with the headline: “Framingham Heart Study Carries on, Despite Budget Cuts: 65-year-old core contract loses 40 percent of funding.”

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