Gawande on what hospitals can learn from The Cheesecake Factory #hcr #mapoli #Boston #healthreform

The New Yorker is offering Atul Gawande’s “Big Med” story online. He asks: Can the health system learn something about delivering quality from The Cheesecake Factory restaurant chain, which is not as cheesy as you might assume?

He visits both a Cheesecake Factory kitchen at the Prudential Center mall, Armin Ernst, who runs the intensive-care-unit operations in Steward’s ten hospitals, and John Wright at the Brigham, who runs a ” now decade-long experiment in standardizing joint-replacement surgery.”

He’s a tower crane of a man, six feet four inches tall, and so bald he barely seems to have eyebrows. He’s informal in attire—I don’t think I’ve ever seen him in a tie, and he is as apt to do rounds in his zip-up anorak as in his white coat—but he exudes competence.

“Customization should be five per cent, not ninety-five per cent, of what we do,” he told me. A few years ago, he gathered a group of people from every specialty involved—surgery, anesthesia, nursing, physical therapy—to formulate a single default way of doing knee replacements. They examined every detail, arguing their way through their past experiences and whatever evidence they could find. Essentially, they did what Luz considered the obvious thing to do: they studied what the best people were doing, figured out how to standardize it, and then tried to get everyone to follow suit.

At Steward, he met with Armin Ernst:

Late one Friday evening, I joined an intensive-care-unit team on night duty. But this team was nowhere near a hospital. We were in a drab one-story building behind a meat-trucking facility outside of Boston, in a back section that Ernst called his I.C.U. command center. It was outfitted with millions of dollars’ worth of technology. Banks of computer screens carried a live feed of cardiac-monitor readings, radiology-imaging scans, and laboratory results from I.C.U. patients throughout Steward’s hospitals. Software monitored the stream and produced yellow and red alerts when it detected patterns that raised concerns. Doctors and nurses manned consoles where they could toggle on high-definition video cameras that allowed them to zoom into any I.C.U. room and talk directly to the staff on the scene or to the patients themselves.

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/08/13/120813fa_fact_gawande#ixzz23Qhk6Wy5

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