UMass Med: Survival rates up for some heart attacks

Here’s a link to the actual study. For non-cardiologist, the term STEMI  is short  for a type of heart attack called a ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The elevation of note is spike in a ECG and it suggest a potentially disastrous loss of blood flow to the heart.

Science Daily reports:

Coronary syndromes vary in severity, ranging from unstable angina, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), to ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the most severe diagnosis….

..Encouraging declines in 1-year death rates were observed for patients with STEMI or NSTEMI. The odds of dying during the first year after hospital discharge decreased steadily among patients with STEMI between 1997 and 2005. By 2005, the odds of dying within 1 year after discharge was 50% lower among STEMI patients in comparison with those admitted in 1997; a non-significant and inconsistent trend toward lower odds of dying within 1 year of hospitalization was noted among patients with NSTEMI…

David D. McManus of the cardiovascular division of the UMass Department of Quantitative Health Sciences and Medicine,  said,  “Mortality from NSTEMI remained significantly higher than STEMI at both 30 days and 1 year. The higher long-term death rates observed in patients discharged after NSTEMI may have resulted from the fact that patients with NSTEMI were in general older and had a greater burden of cardiovascular comorbidities. Under-utilization of effective cardiac medications and PCI, as well as greater delays in the time to receipt of PCI in patients with NSTEMI, may also have contributed to differences in the post-discharge death rates observed in these patients.”

 

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